Posted in Activities & Enrichment, Toddlers

Any one worry about kid being too advanced...

Vic

It's a double edged sword I want to teach my kid everything I know and more, but he is already adept at pre k curriculum at 28 months. I'm worried that he wont be engaged and challenged when he actually goes to kindergarten. What else can I teach him right now? To be competitive and well rounded in current times but that will supplement a standard education.

  • E
    May 28

    Social-emotional regulation, self-help skills, art, imaginary play.

  • Diana
    May 28

    My child is older than yours and does not yet know her numbers, letters or colors, etc. However, she knows how to clean up when she makes a mess, how to ask for help instead of getting frustrated (and how to show people what she’s asking for if they can’t understand the words she’s saying), how to sit calmly (even when she doesn’t want to), how to wait her turn, and how to find something else to play with when another child wants to share and she doesn’t (well, this one’s still a work in progress, but doing good so far!). Basically, I’m teaching her everything to make her a good student for her future teacher so she will be able to learn the details later. We also talk about everyday tasks - where the water from the faucet comes from, how electricity works, why and how we clean, how banks and money works, how gasoline makes the car go, etc. I don’t know how much she truly understands yet - but I know far too many teenagers / adults that don’t even know how food is grown... so I want to expose her to the “basics” early on.

  • Anonymous
    May 28

    You should check out busytoddler if you Instagram. She gives a lot of activities, sells activity books if there is more you want to do, but also talks about why she's keeping her kids at home as long as possible. My son is 3 and knowledge-wise ready for pre-k, but sitting still is a major challenge, so we will spend the next year working on that, and trying to engage him in sit-down activities like arts and crafts, and learning to play by himself.

  • Julie
    May 28

    I would never stop teaching anyone (child or adult) who was interested in learning. And he won’t be bored in kindergarten, your school will (should) adjust and help him find other enriching lessons and learnings. Having said that, ensuring he also has emotional lessons and understands and conceptualizes important things like empathy, consent, sharing, teaching, helping, etc. explaining deeper concepts and seeing if he can grasp it (like community service, helping others, etc) are all important life lessons that are never too early to teach. Also, things that are so much fun and won’t necessarily be part of the kindergarten curriculum can be taught at any age. Chemistry, baking, food prep, solar system, geography, geology, read a kids book about the presidents, learn about weather patterns, plant some seeds and talk about photosynthesis, teach him about cells and evolution, etc etc etc.

  • Julie
    May 29

    I thought of something else🙃. My close friends son is extremely book smart. He’s 10 and will graduate high school later this summer. She told me recently that her biggest problem and worry with him is that he has no friends because he simply cannot relate to regular intelligence kids. And he’s quite cocky about it (will have trouble helping others learn and will instead say things that alienate him from others like, “wow you can’t do THAT!? I could do that when I was 6!!!”). She said her biggest regret is letting comments like that slide when he was 14 months old and speaking full sentences and saying things like that was super cute and funny. It normalized rude behavior from a very early age and has been hard to undo. I’m not sure if your child is that level of gifted that he’s at a point where he realizes he’s smarter, but if so try to remediate and address behavior early on like taunting kids his own age for not being able to do what he does. Instead maybe encourage him to help teach others what he knows, etc. My friends son is honestly hard to be around because like every child with doting and loving parents, he grew up hearing how special and smart he was. But unlike most children, he’s genius level IQ and has an unbelievably difficult time relating to others his age. He’s very lonely because of this and has only a few other “extremely gifted” friends that he knows online and meets up with a couple times a year. Oh and the other thing I forgot to mention or suggest in my first post is teach him other languages!!

  • Vic
    May 29

    Thank you all so much for these helpful and valuable responses. I include lessons about how to Express feelings and guide him in regulating his emotions. We really need to work on sitting still for longer periods of time. And I love the idea of doing fun kid projects...I actually just picked up a book of crafts and activities for toddlers. I think I'll run off a few copies of my favorites for us to do. You all are so right about the social aspects of learning. I havent placed a big emphasis on it since we havent had any occurrences that would be a problem. I definitely dont want to encourage pomposity.

  • Suzy
    May 30

    When in elementary school, if he’s not challenged have them test his capabilities (bc public school now is all about taking and passing tests), if he shows he can bump a grade ask them to do so. I skipped a couple grades with my parents help.

  • Anonymous
    May 30

    My daughter is 19mo. She knew all her colors by one year. She can count to 20, knows most of the alphabet, and knows all of her shaped (including trapezoids and hexagons). I'm nervous that she'll be picked on for being smart as there were several kids I saw throughout school be made fun of simply because they were smart. I'm also nervous because she wont play with kids her age. The youngest child she has willingly played with was 4yo. She doesn't take interest in kinds her age which I feel like it may stunt her social skills.