Shirin K.
check_circleChild Care Provider

Are you thinking of closing your daycare due to coronavirus.

I have a daycare in SF. Right now all 90 parochial schools in the Bay Area have been closed for 2 weeks and some other preschools, elementary schools and probably some daycares are doing the same. If/when you decide to close how are you handling tuition? Should I reimburse for the days in March that I close? Prorate April?

  • Anonymous
    Mar 19

    Kudos to the daycares that are considering this impact on families. We take our 10 month old to a national franchise daycare. And it is still charging families tuition while it’s closed. I am all for paying employees—please believe that. But my partner is no longer getting paid because he’s a wage worker, we can’t use daycare services, and working from home with an infant is MANIC! I think it’s deplorable to guilt families into carrying the financial burden of a national corporation continuing to pay its staff, by paying for services they’re not receiving (and need). If families CHOOSE to pay/donate—fine (and God bless them!). But many of us cannot, and struggle to afford childcare as it is!! We shouldn’t be forced to assume this hardship/risk—the government should pay!

  • Anonymous
    Mar 19

    We are a small School Age provider in South Jersey... We are remaining open to support those families that do not have the economic choice or are themselves among the many healthcare, police, fire etc. that are deemed essential and have not other choice. Our students are usually only with us after school. We are charging families who are using us for the full day an additional $5.00 - it doesn't come close to covering the staffing cost increase. The NIH and CDC warned that school closure would increase the number of grandparents (already 41% have some sort of "grandchild care" role) caring for children who may have been exposed already. I worked in healthcare for a long time as well - there are people who run toward the crisis... our communities need us to help for the greater good!

  • Anonymous
    Mar 19

    I understand this from both point of view. Our school is the last one open in our valley. We are a non profit and if we close our staff don’t qualify for unemployment. If parents choice to not pay tuition we can not continue to pay staff and our essential bills. Like they said above, it’s important for those who can to continue to pay so small mom and pops schools will still be here when this is done. I clearly understand that big corporations have the money to refund families but some school truly depend on tuition payments. I’m willing to work with families on individual needs. I also think it’s unfair that insurance don’t cover loss of income during this time.

  • Anonymous
    Mar 19

    Question: if liability insurance is not covering this pandemic across the board, what factors cause one daycare to be able to suspend tuition for its families v. another daycare that can’t/won’t? I’m genuinely curious.

  • Anonymous
    Mar 19

    The honest truth to your question is money. Big business( corporate schools) large schools and those who can afford will and can suspend tuition. Small schools, non profits can not. If we knew for sure we would be able to reopen in a week or two , sure, but it is the unknown. Will this be a couple weeks, or months. Even though a facility may be closed they still have bills, insurances, rent, gas, water, electric, and so on. How long can a school remain close and cover these payment without any tuition payments coming in? This may cause an end to non commercial preschools if it last to long.

  • Austin
    Mar 19

    here's some anecdotal info. we're in TX, pulled our children from their two separate day cares (one is 6 and goes to an afterschool program that is running all day for spring break this week and will continue after while schools are shutter, the other is 2) starting this past tuesday. yesterday we heard from another parent at our 2-year-old's daycare that his son is coming down with a fever. it turns out another parent at the day care is a dentist and worked on a patient confirmed to have COVID-19 last week. the day care is shutting down today through at least tuesday to deep clean the school. anyone that is able to keep their children home should do so, and sadly i suspect most already are and this is just going to be a crack in our collective social distancing efforts.

  • Anonymous
    Mar 19

    @childcareaware (https://childcareaware.org) has some great information being used by states across America. From their flowchart (https://info.childcareaware.org/blog/should-i-close-my-child-care-program-a-coronavirus-flowchart) to their recent webinar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8JhYIoR9Vk) to their state by state updates (https://www.childcareaware.org/resources/map/).

  • Bonnie Wacker
    check_circleChild Care Provider Mar 19

    I am a large family daycare 12 students in my home and we closed last week. I'm offering on-line preschool which is circle time via zoom and sending work by email to my students. I'm not sure how I'm going to pay my assistant and my monthly bills now that my income is in question. Some parents have paid me but most probably won't. Ive told my assistant I will continue paying her until the end of the year June as she has a child in college. I have one daughter in college and my expenses are high so I don't really know how I'm going to do this. I have about 4,000 in savings which I can use to cover this coming month, but I don't know how to proceed. I think I'm going to ask parents to pay me for the reduced hours of the on line class and materials and hopefully that will be enough to cover some of it.

  • Tracy
    Mar 19

    We live in SF, and our son’s daycare closed this week as mandated. However since we are able to pay them even if we aren’t using them, we will continue to do so. They mean a lot to us, and we need to help those we can for as long as we can. The last thing we want is for them to have to shut down permanently. I understand that not everyone has the means to continue paying, but I hope that those who do, will contribute for the greater good.

  • Peggy L.
    check_circleChild Care Provider Mar 19

    I too have a home preschool. I have chosen to stay open, however, the majority of my parents have chosen to keep their child(ren) home. I totally get. Our health is one of our top priority. Nonetheless, how do we continue to survive if our income has been slashed. I'm aware the Federal government is offering small businesses a Florida Emergency Bridge Loan - Disaster@FloridaSBDC.org. Look into your city's and state's website, they maybe offering some kind of relief. My only concern is it is a LOAN which means we have to pay it back. They do give us 1 year with 0 % interest to pay it back. However, as we all know, we do not know how long this will last and how much, economically, we will be scared. I think they should give us 2 years of 0% interest - just in case. One good that I've seen coming out of this is that we are trying to work together as a global unity -even with our differences.

  • Amy
    Mar 19

    My daughter is in preschool in SF and we paid March's tuition already (school was closed starting Monday). We were told we would not receive a refund for the remaining of the March tuition. While initially I was a bit upset and surprised, I understand the preschool has bills to pay and want to support the teachers and staff as much as possible during this time. Thankfully, our family has the economic means to do this. Unfortunately, I know not everyone is in that position..

  • Trina
    Mar 21

    I'm a Family Home Daycare Provider in Md. I am still open although all schools and businesses are closed. Many of my parents choose to keep their child home. (I definitely would) They continue to pay their tuition. It's in their contract that you must pay whether your child is present or absent. This is our livelihood. If we have no income we can not live. Teachers are home still getting paid. I dont hear any complaints about that. It's one thing if the parent is home and no longer getting pd from their employer but if you are why not continue to pay your daycare provider. I told my parents you are more than welcome to withdraw (2 wk notice) and re enroll if a space is available at that time. But if you dont want to take the chance of the slot being taken you have to continue to pay. We are a business and we have bills to be paid as well.

  • Amy L.
    check_circleChild Care Provider Mar 23

    I'm the director of a church-based preschool in the ATL suburbs. We're struggling with these same questions. We're leaning toward surveying parents to see whether they would pay at least partial tuition (if they are able) if we provide a home lesson plan to include live-time and webinar teacher lesson plans, story time, music, dance, etc. If we have children at all these days, we're all becoming homeschool parents to a degree. So I want to provide the best possible track so important learning isn't lost, while also honoring each family's needs during this unprecedented time.

  • Leonor
    check_circleChild Care Provider Mar 23

    No need :) to close as long you follow guidelines:)

  • Peggy L.
    check_circleChild Care Provider Mar 26

    Here in Broward county, FL, the guidelines are a total of 10 maximum, that number includes staff. As for me, that will limit me to 8 students and 2 staff. I would recommend you going to your county's website and read the laws.

  • Matthew
    Mar 27

    @Trina, didn't we just hear that MD child care is closing as of this evening? It sounds like home or center based needs a Covid-19 certificate?

  • Anonymous
    Thursday

    This is a question about home-based childcare centers. The one my toddler goes to (in CA) serves 8 kids and remains open. The state has said that that's for parents who are "essential" workers to use; I am not an essential workers so I cannot use the daycare. However the provider insists on charging us 100% tuition while we keep our toddler at home. What's strange to me is that all the parents have said they are willing to pay 50%, but the provider insists on 100% tuition. My question is, is it unrealistic to expect that a home-based daycare could get by with 50% tuition? My estimate is that 50% would be ~$4000/month. I don't see how their ongoing expenses could be above that. They have 2 staff btw (the director and the director's mother), and are located in Orange County.

  • Trina
    Saturday

    @Matthew yes we were all ordered to close but for those that want to stay open for essential parents we were required to apply to be an Essential Personnel Child Care Provider. And the state is paying for their childcare.

  • Anonymous
    Saturday

    As of April 1st - NJ ordered all centers that did not apply for Emergency Center status (supplying care for ONLY Essential Personnel) to close. They gave essential personnel families 2 days to register for care and the State is paying for that care! For our center, it is only a small number of students and the standards imposed (checking for elevated temp, signs/symptoms, having parents attest to wellness and no COVID-19 in their house) - seem a bit extreme, but in the end, if you decide to stay open - these measure help protect students and staff! Otherwise, we are not billing our families for the lost time and are hoping that the Paycheck Protection program will cover us and allow us to keep staff on the payroll - we are doing our mandatory training, organizing, and cleaning (a lot)... it is a great opportunity to get things done... not a vacation!