Daycare anxiety

Good hello everyone! My LO is currently 10 weeks old and will be starting daycare in 2 weeks. While I think my husband and I picked one of the best daycares in the area, I am having a lot of anxiety about him going. He just feels so little and knowing he won’t get 1:1 attention is hard for me to deal with. Any reassuring thoughts or suggestions for getting through this separation and making going to daycare easier on him.

  • Beverly Vantine
    Nov 21

    My kid is 4 and went to day care as early as 8 weeks. We also picked one of the best daycare and they absolutely loved on him and took great care. Did he get the one-on-one time like at home, no. But that's ok. He was loved and never neglected. I think his behavior, vocabulary, and personality are better off since he did go to day care instead of being with me all day and me getting frustrated. While we only have a few hours on week days with him, they're very cherished, we never argue, and we make that time count. I still wish I had more time, we all do no matter what, but I don't regret my decision in the least bit.

  • Ossanak M.
    check_circleChild Care Provider Nov 21

    Hi, according to my experience choosing a Home daycare works better than center for infants.

  • anonymous mom
    Nov 22

    Hi Bianca, I hope you’re doing okay! Going back to work is sooo hard. I just wanted to let you know that I also put my daughter into an amazing daycare on her 12 week birthday. It was sooo hard!! But not because of be teachers. The teachers were amazing...what was hard was leaving her every day after growing her and then caring for her 24/7 for basically a year before that. In my experience, the teachers were so understanding and loving with my daughter. They gave her so much love and she absolutely adored them. My daughter has thrived in daycare. There are some negatives. For example, she got her first ever illness by her second week in daycare. And it was bad (RSV). It made her very sick and kept me up all night worrying about her while she slept and fought it. She’s had RSV two other times since and every time it’s nasty, but a little better each time. Since the first illness there have been lots of other illnesses (colds and sniffles and one stomach bug and the dreaded hand/foot/mouth and pink eye), but now that she’s 2 I already see a marked decrease in the severity of these illnesses and an increase in how well she fights them (knock on wood). But to be honest, the positives are so amazing that they far outweigh the negatives. She’s growing so independent, her teachers have taught her so much and she engages in so many activities that I’d never even think about or come up with. She loves her teachers and talks to me all night about her friends at school. My daughter is an only child and will 99.9% always be an only child, so I really appreciate that we can send her to a school that will help her grow and learn some of the early socializing skills that I maybe wouldn’t be able to routinely help her do otherwise. Good luck with going back to work, mama. Those first weeks are so hard! But with time and routine you will find that little by little, it gets easier.

  • bj
    Nov 22

    It's not any easy choice. For me, my oldest went to a daycare and he was sick all the time. When my daughter came along, I decided to find a home to care for her. It turned out to be a better choice. Go with your inner voice, it will never steer you wrong. BTW - you can always change from home care to daycare nothing is cut in stone....Good luck.

  • David Carmona
    Nov 24

    We feel so lucky to have worked out a nanny share which typically is really hard to manage but... If you can, it's an alternative we love.

  • Tiana
    Nov 24

    I’d recommend a nanny share or a home daycare where someone has literally sacrificed their home to their business plan. I worked in the infant room at the BEST daycare in our town and it still left 1 adult to 4 babies. Babies don’t instinctively play with other babies until they’re over a year old. They’re inherently self-absorbed, and need an adult to engage with.