Posted in Child Care, Coronavirus (COVID-19), Money

Do you think it is right that daycares are charging Parents full price when the daycare has closed?

Anonymous

My child's daycare closed starting yesterday 3/23 but we have received a letter stating that we are still required to pay for tuition costs because they have utilities and the workers to pay. I know this is a tough time for everyone but why should I keep paying for services that I am actually not receiving. I love his current daycare but once this is all over, I may be switching because it just isn't right. I'm juggling working from & taking care of a toddler simultaneously while the daycare isn't operating & they aren't working. There was nothing stated in the policy of how they deal with state emergencies or similar situations.

  • Ashley
    Mar 24

    No that’s definitely not right. yeah they have bills and staff. but you have bills and a family. they aren’t providing you a service you shouldn’t pay. especially because of what’s going on. they are talking of getting loans that could be considered grants if they use it for bills or to pay wages, to small businesses. it’s unfortunate but they clearly aren’t thinking of you parents during this. i might look into a new one as well. they need to re-evaluate themselves. i love KinderCare (hopefully that’s not your current one lol) you should look into them if it’s not.

  • Debra S.
    check_circleChild Care Provider Mar 24

    I agree. It isn't right to charge the families at a time when a national crisis is happening. No one expected this. My center is open and operating and we are waiving fees (temporarily) for families that have had to stay home due to the loss of their jobs or because they now have school agers to home school. We are going to maintain that for as long as we can before making any other decisions!

  • Tanya A.
    check_circleChild Care Provider Mar 24

    I am a daycare owner. I am a very small business and while this is all going on I have bills that I will still incur at the business. I am not mandating any of my parents to do anything during this time. However I have asked if there are any of my families that are currently getting paid through their employers and their financial status has not been interrupted that they would consider that they are my employer and that I would be grateful for any help at this crazy time that we are all going through. I added that obviously I would never want to be a burden to any of my families because we love them all and care about them. I understand that everybody’s situation is different.

  • B
    Mar 24

    I think if you want your daycare to still be around after this is over, and you want teachers to come back, paying at least partial tuition is a good thing. Mine asked if we were still getting paid from work to pay partial so that they didn’t have to fire the staff and could pay them. I love our teachers and I’m lucky to still have a job. I’d like them to keep theirs too.

  • Loyda Lopez
    check_circleChild Care Provider Mar 26

    Hello I'm a daycare owner and I still open with a little amount of kids and the parents who keep kids in home they have to pay half fee In order to hold the baby spot.while i ,i open if im closed they no have to pay anything bc everyone is in the same boat at this time .that's my policy. And everybody is happy with that.i hope others parents understand .

  • Anonymous
    Mar 26

    I’m in the same situation except even worse, not only am I not receiving tuition or partial tuition but I’m also an employee of this facility and only getting partial pay through March ... nevertheless I don’t see top leadership sacrificing their 6 figure salaries to pay their employees and/or help families whose lives have been financially upended. I’m in a weird spot where if I say something I feel like I’m compromising my job. I emailed top leadership with suggestions if not reimbursing families: Zoom story time with their teacher, teacher provides activity of the day, music class with teacher, it’s the LEAST they can do!!! I understand it costs a lot to run a facility but it was just announced that businesses will be getting financial assistance, how do I know this money isn’t going straight to the top? Can they publicly disclose their financial records?

  • Anonymous
    Mar 26

    So daycare opens back on Monday but my son won't be able to attend because I am not considered essential personnel but I won't have to pay anything while he isn't there. I am happy that he will be able to stay at his current daycare. I wouldn't had mind a partial fee but full price for no services is asking a lot. His daycare is a small intimate daycare & as a teacher, I often bring in supplies and food for all the children because I understand. Now, does anyone have tips with teaching high school math online with a toddler running around & getting into everything in the background, I'm struggling a little bit. Lol

  • Anonymous
    Thursday

    I don't think it's right to charge unless 1) they ask and give you a choice, vs requiring it, 2) they can tell you where the money goes and explain why they need that much. Note that both of these things is mostly about tone and communication. I think that goes a long way. My toddler goes to an in-home daycare (in CA) that serves 8 kids. They chose to remain open and are charging all parents 100% of tuition, even though most of us are non-essential workers and can't use it (I think currently they only have 2 out of 8 kids attending). Now, we the parents all support the daycare and have collectively said we are willing to pay 50%, with an option for those who can afford it to give more than that. But nope, the provider insists on 100% tuition and won't give us any other option or information. She did say that we can unenroll if we want. I think it's the tone of all this that bothers me most. When people are given a choice to help, they feel good about helping. But when forced, it breeds resentment. So kudos to the providers here who have given parents a choice or a discount of some kind. Or who've honestly and authentically asked for help instead of imposing it with no flexibility. That goes a long way with parents.