Posted in Developmental Disorders, Food & Cooking, Nutrition, Toddlers

I need reassurance and you tell me what you think??

Anonymous

So my in laws have been watching my LO for a couple of days and they seem to think my son has autism/some type of eating disorder. He doesn’t like eating solids, and he’s really picky with what he eats but he does love sweets 🤦‍♀️ because of his dad. (We still encourage him at home to eat solids/healthy food etc.) he loves those pouches that are like purée foods (apple sauce pouches) etc. so he DOES NOT care for eggs, whole milk and formula. He LOVES his #1 supply and that’s breast milk! He will not eat that much food for them while I work and it’s like he’ll take a bite and he feels the texture of the food and throws it cause it’s feels and it tastes weird to him. But idk why thy think he has autism, he’s only 1. And I thought when your pregnant they’d screen for Down syndrome? I honestly just think he’s picky. They keep comparing him to one of their family friends kids who has autism and that their friends child only ate butter and milk.. my son doesn’t just eat butter he’ll eat and stuff it just depends. Idk! You guys tell me! I kinda get offended when they tell me stuff like that! And I don’t have anything against it but that makes me more worried because I work as a behavioral tech and work with young adults who have Autism/Down syndrome and it’d be hard as a parent taking care of children with autism I know how it is at work! But when people assume that upon my child?? Idk...it’s just negative to me.

  • Lynn
    Jan 25

    He’s only 1. Is he very late on milestones? And when kids start out on purées, it takes them longer to move to chunkier Foods. It’s also still a huge time to explore foods. Serving sizes for kids is 1 tbsp per age. So he only needs 1 tbsp per food group to have a complete meal. That’s really not a lot to us, but it is to a 1 year old.

  • MamaNukesYopolo
    Jan 25

    I would trust your doctors opinion on autism and not your in-laws. A lot of kids have sensory issues. Heck, I hate certain foods because of their textures, even if they taste good. My middle child hates having his hands dirty but that doesn’t mean he’s autistic. If your truly concerned I would run it by the pediatrician. But grandparents always seem to think they know everything because they’ve done it before. They know stuff, but not everything. Especially not stuff like that.

  • Ivy
    Jan 25

    Is that their only basis for thinking he has autism? My 3 year old was just diagnosed (ASD level 1) in November, but I saw signs since he was an infant. He was always ahead on his milestones, however, and was always a great eater as an infant. Only recently has he developed aversions and preferences to certain foods (which really sucks). As for screening in the womb, I don’t recall that it is one of the genetic disorders they typically detect or look for (Down’s syndrome is a common one screened for), however, I’m sure it depends on where you go. I think if you haven’t noticed anything, considering you work with children that have behavioral issues, you probably know more. You know your child best, as well. I always knew my son was different, but people would downplay it. Sometimes relatives can say hurtful things, thinking they’re helpful, but at the end of the day, you know your son best

  • Anonymous
    Jan 25

    I didn’t know that about the 1 tbsp I will try that! And he’s late on walking too! I’ve heard boys take longer than girls on development

  • Anonymous
    Jan 25

    Haha! Well said thank you! @mamanukes and thank you too @T!

  • Anonymous
    Jan 25

    Thank you Ivy you are right. And yes they seem to compare children they know and think my son has the same problem. And it was actually the Down syndrome screening I remember doing! Sorry everyone but wow yes I guess I just get so caught up with their opinions about my son I need to just set a boundary and tell them he’s fine and the doctor says he’s healthy. Thank you for your feed back 🙏

  • Pad
    Jan 25

    You aren’t crazy but your in-laws are oh and for a one year old it sounds perfectly normal.

  • Victoria
    Jan 25

    He is completely normal for a one year old ! All my nephews are the same way. I got lucky with my daughter, she eats almost everything. But at one they are still pretty new to eating and they start getting picky around that time as well.

  • Jannelle
    Jan 25

    Don’t feel bad about him being late, my oldest son didn’t start walking till he was 16 months. Haha, it’s just normal.

  • Anonymous
    Jan 25

    You can’t screen for autism during pregnancy. It often shows up later; regressive autism. If it’s just eating, it’s probably ok, if there are other concerns, you’d might want to look into it with a specialist, or at least speak to your pediatrician.

  • Anonymous
    Jan 26

    My daughter is very picky when it comes to food too. She started eating solid food at 12 mos and now she’s 17mos still picky and doesn’t eat a lot. Also, she just start walking by herself exactly at 17 mos

  • Anonymous
    Jan 26

    In laws 101: smile and nod, smile and nod

  • Anonymous
    Jan 26

    Lol! @ in laws 101! That made me laugh! I will think about that every time I disagree with them lol!

  • Anonymous
    Jan 26

    Thank you all so much for your help and feedback about your LO’s too it helped a lot I read all your comments 🙌

  • Kait
    Jan 26

    It’s horrible of them to say that to you. Your kid is still very little and sometimes kids are picky. Always trust your momma intuition over people who don’t know your baby like you.

  • Lynn
    Jan 26

    From 15 months until 3 years old my daughter went through a Costco size jar of mixed nuts every week. She ate a variety of other food, but she lived off mixed nuts. Her pediatrician said it was fine. She met and exceeded all milestones. Wasn’t lethargic. Etc.

  • Maria
    Feb 18

    Picky eating is only one of the signs and symptoms of Autism or any other sensory processing disorder (SPD). Look into poor eye contact, tip toeing, staring into a light/fan or space, self stimming (flapping hands, rocking), repetitive behavior. If anything just mention to his pediatrician. You will need to complete an MCHAT questionnaire when he turns two years old anyway. That is to determine if he is showing signs of ASD.

  • Anonymous
    Feb 18

    Thank you 🙏

  • Julie
    Feb 19

    Unless your in laws are your child’s pediatrician, they simply have no idea what they’re talking about. If you take your child to their regular dr visits and discuss concerns with them, their pediatrician should be able to evaluate and quickly diagnose or refer you. Just discuss with your pediatrician and tell the in laws to shut up or not expect any alone time with your child anymore. BTW what is it with in laws trying to diagnose and/or use 1970s pediatric recommendations to “treat” our babies?!? 🙄

  • Lynn
    Feb 19

    You can also consult with a a neuropsychological clinic. They specialize in evaluating IQ, autism, spectrum, add, learning disabilities. There should be some in your area. I emailed several clinics and started conversations about my concerns about my kid, requested quotes (it’s not cheap), and they did a comprehensive IQ evaluation with her. We called it special game day. Also, if your pediatrician thinks there’s an issue, then it’s likely that your health insurance will cover it if there’s a problem. Mine didn’t but that’s because we weren’t testing for disabilities.