Anonymous

When is it time to let the nanny go?

We have a nanny who is a sweet lady who has been working for us for almost 2 years. She’s a bargain, $15/hr for one kid and $18/hr to watch two. She only works for us 10 hours a week. When we hired her she agreed that she would do housework when our son was asleep, but in recent months she has been getting super lazy. She arrives around 8:30, and my son doesn’t go wake up till 10. She sits around on her phone and eats breakfast. Then my son usually goes down for his nap around 1, and she spends about 2 hours folding one load of laundry and putting some dishes in the dishwasher. Shes usually on her phone, and she even tries to sit in a spot where our camera can’t see her. I’ve tried giving her lists of stuff to do, but it just gets so repetitive and ends up being a lot of work for me and I feel like I am paying too much to keep her. I also feel like I have to micromanage her. My husband wants to offer her more money so maybe she will step it up, but I feel like it’s just time for someone new. How much notice do we have to give her? And am I being too hard on her?

  • Cristina
    Sep 30

    No she needs to be doing her job and yes find someone new she needs to pay attention

  • Jovani
    Sep 30

    I would talk to her first. maybe she feels like she’s bing under paid for what she is doing.

  • Emily
    Sep 30

    I don't think she's being under paid at all. Before I was a mom I was a nanny and she's getting pretty decent pay for 10 hours a week. She needs to be doing her job. I know as a nanny sometimes the job feels under appreciated and it's tedious but that doesn't mean you slack. She probably feels like it's easy money honestly. It doesn't sound like your asking for a lot. I worked as a full time nanny and I made more but that's how it is in the field works. Has her pay increased at all since you hired her? If not maybe consider giving her a dollar or two more. But after you talk to her and see an improvement. Don't pay more for a lazy employee cause there's someone out there that will do her job way better for the same pay rate she makes now. Also a good amount of time to give is two weeks it should be more than enough for her find a new job and for you to find someone else.

  • Shauna
    Sep 30

    Seriously Emily, I agree. I'll take her position and help you fire her as well. Lol no j/k lol She's getting lazy because for her it's a repetitive job and easy money like Emily says. 2 weeks notice like any other job is good enough. I don't think it's because of the pay why she's being lazy, she probably feels it's been 2 years now you won't/wouldn't let her go. Find someone with the real passion to help your home and family because that was the whole point.

  • Nandi
    Sep 30

    Housework and a nanny? Where do you live because where I’m from a nanny will want 25hr just to watch your child and an extra cost for housework

  • Anonymous
    Oct 01

    A nanny is there to make your life easier . Not do everything for you . She has her own life too . If you plan on firing her give her at least a 2 weeks notice . You don’t know what her situation is and 15 an hour ????? You shouldn’t be complaining .

  • Andrea
    Oct 02

    If she was doing her tasks then I’d consider giving her a raise. You don’t get a raise for failing to meet your boss’s expectations. Because you know what will happen? When she thinks she deserves another raise she will slack off until you give her more money & then she will do what you were expecting of her the entire time.

  • Diane L Baker
    Oct 02

    I used to be a nanny until I had my own child, and there's just no excuse for her behavior/so give her the old heave ho!!!

  • Nile
    Oct 02

    I would not consider that a bargain. We pay our nanny $12.50/hr for TWO kids plus she does some light housework. So $15/hr for one kid who is asleep like half the time and she's not doing housework during that time??? I'd definitely have a chat with her about what's expected and let her know that you're not okay with how she's been spending her time and if she isn't willing to to step it up, let her go.

  • Lexi
    Oct 02

    I have been a professional nanny/governess for 8 years. I am a neat freak and generally keep a clean house even if it wasn't my mess to clean, but that's also above and beyond my job's description. I know that if I don't want to do those things, I am not expected to. A nanny's duties are those that directly pertain to the children. If you expect her to do dishes/clean up messes made by you [even messes you made with kids while on parenting duty]/prepare meals other than for your kids/do your laundry, you are also using her as a housekeeper and should pay her an additional fee. That being said, as with any problem, if you are having an issue, bring it up with her. There is no telling what she is feeling without talking to her about it. A gentle way to bring it up could be, "I know when you first started it was agreed that you would help around the house. Is that still the case?" If so, outline specifically what you would like her to be doing. If you value your nanny it is worth trying to salvage the relationship.

  • Anonymous
    Oct 02

    Ugh-- what an uncomfortable situation! Household employees are so tricky. If she were any other hourly employee, it'd so SO inappropriate to arrive to work an immediately take a paid breakfast break, or to sit and play on her phone on the clock! Traditionally, nannies are responsible for child care and child-related cleaning/laundry tasks. Did you outline for her the "housekeeping" that would be expected from her when the child is sleeping? As a former nanny, and nanny boss, realistically it'll be time to let her go and hire someone new. I'd recommend with the new nanny to have a written "contract" outlining specific duties and expectations, so everyone is on the same page. I'd include in the new write up, to arrive to the home ready to work (i.e. not sit down and eat breakfast), and that smartphone use should be limited while at work.

  • Kara
    Oct 03

    She's your nanny, not your maid. Those are two separate jobs. Nannies look after child care, not the cleanlieness of your home. Especially not for just 15 an hour.